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E2 Visas for Traders and Treaty Investors

Certain countries have trade treaties with the U.S., which allow for immigration for foreign nationals from these countries to seek a visa. A Treaty Trader can gain an E-1 visa when the individual is involved in substantial trade, such as trade in services or technology between the treaty country and the USA, or involved in the development and direction of substantial capital with regard to trade.

Treaty Trader Requirements: E-1 Visa

A Treaty Trader must be a national of one of the treaty countries, and the volume of trade must be substantial for an individual to be deemed eligible. The trade involved could include the exchange of goods, services or technology, and 50% of the trade must be with the U.S. and the treaty country of origin of the person who is applying for the visa.

Treaty Investor Requirements: E-2 Visa

A Treaty Investor has criteria to meet in order to be granted an E-2 visa. The investment in the U.S. must be substantial. It must be of an amount that is of high enough value to ensure the success of the venture. The venture must be an operating enterprise, not a speculative or non-functioning investment. Any funds held in a bank or other security that are not part of an actual operating enterprise will not be considered an investment and will not meet the eligibility requirements for an E-2 visa.

How to Apply for an E-2 Visa in Los Angeles

It is imperative that all paperwork submitted is correct. It is advised that you contact the Immigration Law Office of Los Angeles, P.C. for assistance. A Los Angeles immigration attorney from the firm will assist you to submit the application and all the required supporting documentation so that there are not delays or denials based upon errors or a failure to submit the correct documentation. Any attempt to obtain a visa with a misrepresentation of the facts can badly misfire, and lead to a permanent refusal of a visa or ability to enter the U.S. If you are ineligible under current immigration law to receive a visa, but meet the criteria for an E-2 visa, it is possible that a waiver of ineligibility could be sought to resolve this matter.

Family and E-2 Visas

Your family, which includes your spouse and unmarried children under 21 years old, can apply for E visas to accompany a Treaty Investor. The spouse can also apply for employment authorization so that they are legally able to work in the U.S. during the term of the visa, once approved. Dependent children of the main visa holder will not be granted authorization to work.

Extending a Treaty Investor Visa

If your stay in the U.S. must be extended beyond the time allowed, you must apply for an extension well in advance of the expiration of your visa. Any such extension must be approved by the USCIS, and the firm can assist you with this process. If you stay in the U.S. beyond the authorized period of time, you can be deported immediately, as you are in violation of U.S. immigration law at that point. It is far better to take action to extend your visa so that you do not have to leave the country when it expires. Once you have violated immigration law, it can become far more difficult to resolve the matter. You will be forced to reapply from your country of origin.

Get legal assistance in obtaining or extending a Treaty Trader or Treaty Investor, E-2 Visa from the firm.

For more information on E-1 and E-2 Visas, please click here.


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6601 Center Dr. West, Suite 500 Los Angeles, CA 90045 | Phone: (800) 792-9889  Local Phone: (310) 242-8936 Office Location

6601 Center Dr. West, Suite 500 Los Angeles, CA 90045 | Phone: (800) 792-9889  Local Phone: (310) 242-8936 Office Location

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