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Fiance Visa

Tying The Knot – Immigration And Your Fiancé

By Scott McVarish on February 25, 2015 - Comments off

Most people, even those who have never had any dealings with immigration directly, know one of the quickest ways to become an American citizen is through marriage. Any foreign national who marries a United States citizen, either inside the country or back in his or her home region, is eligible to apply for a green card once the ceremony has been legally confirmed. After the application is received by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) and approved, they are granted permanent status as a United States citizen. Of course, there are varying details per couple and restrictions depending on where you may be coming from or previous history, but, in general, that is one of the fastest paths to U.S. citizenship.

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The Process of Getting a Fiancé Visa

By Scott McVarish on October 6, 2014 - Comments off

LA Marriage ImmigrationIf you are a U.S. citizen and wish to marry someone who is not a citizen and not in the United States, you can obtain a fiancé visa for him or her. The K-1 fiancé nonimmigrant visa allows the applicant to enter the United States, marry an American citizen and live here permanently. Applicants can even bring their unmarried children under the age of 21 by filing for K-2 nonimmigrant visa status.

First, the U.S. citizen will have to file a fiancé visa petition with United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) on behalf of the alien fiancé. Then the USCIS will have to approve the visa petition and transfer the case to the National Visa Center (NVC). After that, the case will be considered and transferred to the consulate of the fiancé’s home country. The alien fiancé and his or her children will have to go through the consulate interview process. If there are any doubts about the legitimacy of the intended marriage, both parties may have to take a fraud interview, but that is not always necessary. Read the rest »

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The Challenges of Securing a Fiancé Visa

By Scott McVarish on April 7, 2014 - Comments off

Getting married can be a complicated process. In addition to planning the wedding, you have to worry about getting the right documents and having them signed by the proper authorities. This process can be a lot more complicated if you wish to marry someone who is a foreign national who wants to relocate to the United States.
Los Angeles Immigration LawIndividuals who are in this type of situation may wonder if they should get married in another country and then move back to the United States, or if the foreign fiancé should travel to the United States to be married here. For many, a K-1 fiancé visa is the most convenient option. Filing a K-1 fiancé visa can typically take less time than getting married in a foreign country and then filing for a spousal petition through consular processing or the K-3 petition. Read the rest »

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What You Need to Know about Getting a Visa for Your Fiancé

By Scott McVarish on January 14, 2014 - Comments off

It is possible to obtain a visa through your significant other and you don’t even have to be married. For example, if you are a U.S. citizen, you can bring your fiancé to the United States with the intention of getting married. You could secure a K-1 nonimmigrant visa for your fiancé to travel to the United States by filing an I-129F fiancé petition, amongst other required forms.
Los Angeles Immigration Law
If you are living in Los Angeles or anywhere else in the United States and want to bring your fiancé here to get married, you will need an I-129F Petition for Alien Fiancé. Please note that California residents and residents of other states that recognize marriage equality may petition for their same-sex fiance. It is a six-page form with nine pages of instructions with a $340 filing fee. If successful, you will then be able to bring your fiancé, and even your fiancé’s children, a K-1 Visa that can lead to permanent residency and even citizenship within three years (if you are a U.S. citizen, 5 years if you are a legal permanent resident). Read the rest »

 

What is a Fiancé(e) Visa?

By Scott McVarish on October 30, 2013 - Comments off

The K-1 visa, also known as a “fiancé(e) visa,” applies to a foreigner who is also the fiancé(e) of a U.S. citizen. The K-1 visa allows the fiancé(e) to travel to the United States and to marry his or her sponsor within 90 days of arriving in the country. Then, the foreign citizen may apply for adjustment of status as a permanent resident.

The children of a K-1 visa applicant may receive K-2 visas, if they are eligible. Because the process can be complicated, the help of an experienced attorney can be invaluable. Read the rest »

 

Help! My immigrant fiance’s ID has expired

By Scott McVarish on February 22, 2011 - Comments off

So, you want to marry a foreign national but his/her visa, driver’s license and passport have all expired. And, you know that the registrar’s office requires a valid non-expired ID in order to issue a marriage license. What do you do? If you fiancée has overstayed his/her visa (technically, they have overstayed their I-94) s/he will not be able to get any U.S. identification. But will their consulate allow them to get one. The answer is usually yes. Your fiancée simply needs to apply for a renewal of his/her passport. Once they receive it then you can get your marriage license even though your fiance’s visa/I-94 has expired. All of this can usually be done without assistance from an attorney.

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Copyright © 2017 The Immigration Law Office of Los Angeles, P.C. - All Rights Reserved. Disclaimer: The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.